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Creative Practice: Part II

Article by Jayson Brinkworth // February 02 2008
Creative Practice: Part II

Hello again everyone. I hope you all had fun with part one of this two part article. I am sure you came up with some very cool and interesting ideas based on this paradiddle concept.

In part two, I am going to give you more ideas of how to expand to different stickings, and combine part one and two for some really cool groove/fill ideas. First off, I need to review part one with you; we had 3 licks in groups of 5, 6 and 7. They were:

5 - RLRRL

6 – RLRRBL

7 – RLRRLRL

We also had a paradiddle pattern (pattern #1) that was as follows

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL

*         *        *        *

(R = ride cymbal; L = snare drum; * = bass drum)

With this we can add our licks to the end of pattern 1, giving us the following:

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRL RLRRL  - 2 groups of 5 at the end

*         *        *        *        *           *

 RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRBL RLRRBL – 2 groups of 6 at the end

*         *        *        *         (no bass drum as it is in pattern)

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRLRL RLRRLRL – 2 groups of 7 at the end

*         *        *        *        *               *

These patterns can be mixed and matched as you wish; it is up to your creative mind to go to work.

PART II

The first thing we will do in this part is change our paradiddle sticking in our licks. Instead of RLRR, we will now play RLLR (this is just a permutation of the original paradiddle). Now our licks in 5, 6 and 7 will look like this:

5 – RLLRL

6 – RLLRBL

7 – RLLRLRL

We will keep our pattern #1 the same for now, but we will change it up later. So when we attach these new groups to the end of pattern #1, it becomes this:

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLLRL RLLRL  - 2 groups of 5 at the end

*          *         *         *         *            *

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLLRBL RLLRBL – 2 groups of 6 at the end

*          *         *         *         (no bass drum as it is in pattern)

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLLRLRL RLLRLRL – 2 groups of 7 at the end

*          *         *         *         *                 *

This may not seem like a big change, but combining these two stickings is essential to developing linear hand patterns.

Now we can have some fun combining part I and part II in various ways. Here are a few examples of how we might do this:

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRL RLLRL

*         *        *        *        *          *

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRBL RLLRBL

*         *        *        *        

RLRR LRLL RLRR LRLL RLRRLRL RLLRLRL

*         *        *        *        *               *

RLRRL RLLRL RLRRL RLLRL

*           *          *           *

RLRRL RLRRBL RLLRL RLLRBL

*                           *

These combinations can go on and on; just don’t be afraid to be creative. Also feel free to move your Right and Left hands around the kit to explore other tonal options. The sky is the limit here! 

We can also change our pattern #1 sticking as well. Try this:

RLLR LRRL RLLR LRRL

*        *         *        *

With this combo, you can attach any group of 5, 6 or 7 at the end to hear different variations. We can also switch it up with a couple more ideas:

RRLR LLRL RRLR LLRL

*         *        *        *

RLRL LRLR RLRL LRLR

*         *        *       *

Writing the exercises out or printing yourself off a copy will definitely enhance your chance for success. I find my students can open their mind even more if they write the patterns out themselves (We are practicing them as we write!). These paradiddle combinations are also covered in so many resources (Stick Control, Future Sounds and many others).

The groupings I have worked on here are only in 5, 6 and 7. You can expand this to 9, 11 or whatever you want. You can also put a little swing into them instead of playing them straight (some great fills in a jazz setting). One thing to keep in mind, as we always should, is that these are licks and we need to make them sound as musical as possible on the drum set.

I hope you have fun with this concept. I know there are some killer patterns waiting to happen. If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact me through my website.




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About the Author
Jayson  Brinkworth

Jayson Brinkworth is an accomplished drummer, percussionist, vocalist, educator and writer based out of Canada. He is co-owner of the Saskatchewan music school Music In The House, as well as the founder of both the Regina Drum Festival and The Stickman Drum Experience.

Jayson proudly endorses Yamaha drums, Sabian cymbals, Vic Firth sticks, Evans heads, Impact cases, Kickport, Flix, Future Sonics and Mountain Rhythm. Visit Jayson online at www.jaysonbrinkworth.com.



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