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There's My Best

Article by Jayson Brinkworth // December 02 2010
There's My Best

Now I don’t want to start this article off on a negative note, but I do need to outline what has inspired me to write this piece. On November 28, 2009, my mother Thelma Marie Brinkworth passed away suddenly. December was obviously a tough month, but family, friends and music got us through that month and this past year. When something of this magnitude happens it brings out many emotions and makes us reflect on a life well lived and on our own lives.

My mom was my biggest fan and supporter in this crazy music career and anything I was involved in. She taught me many lessons in life, but the one that keeps surfacing is this:  Always try your very best at whatever you do; it is all anyone can ask.  I have thought a lot about this in the past year and have taken the initials from my mothers name and came up with my own way of looking at this important lesson.

After we do anything, whether it is a gig, a session, a band practice or an everyday activity, can we honestly say, “There’s My Best”?  Did we dig deep when we needed to and give everything we had? I believe that if we truly give our best in all that we do, we are living a complete, honest and rewarding life. At the end of everyday we can sleep well knowing that we can say, “There’s my best.”

My mom was an amazing woman with the biggest heart in the world. She had the most infectious laugh and was a very loud talker just like myself. She loved music and sort of lived vicariously through my travels in this industry. She was from a family of twelve very loud talkers, so when the whole family was together, well, we could have definitely used some plexi-glass.

I have many fantastic memories of my mom which I hang on to every single day. Everything from being disciplined for things I had done wrong to being encouraged to live my dream of being a musician. She was always in my corner and reminding me to always try my best. When marks weren’t as good as they could have been in school, she would question me if I was really trying my best. Even though I thought I was, I dug a little deeper and found another level of trying I didn’t even know I had!

This taught me that maybe my own perception of my best wasn’t all I was capable of, and that maybe I needed to be pushed or have others push me to be even better. I soon learned that my perception was off and to always push myself to find that other level or gear in my life.

I also remember my mom never really questioning (out loud) some of the decisions I made—going on the road at 19 with people I didn’t know, buying a very expensive drum kit, practicing for hours on end (I was never told to practice, but I was asked to stop practicing many times). This list goes on, but she silently watched as these situations unfolded and I learned my life lessons. She was definitely my biggest fan.

One very strong memory I have of my mom and my music is on my 16th birthday. Obviously I was excited to turn 16. And I had received money as a present. Mom had encouraged me to save this money with a start on buying my first vehicle. This seemed like a good idea, but for some reason my obsession with drumming and music got the best of me. I took some of the money and bought a Pearl boom stand and an 18“ Sabian thin crash from the music store. She was so pissed at me for spending a good chunk of this money on music gear. As this situation passed, we both learned a lesson. She learned how much drumming really meant to me, and I learned that I was a drum geek that was meant to do this. We did share laughs about this years later—after many more cymbal stands and cymbals had been purchased.

I am so lucky to be able to have music as a career. I never take it for granted. I am also very lucky to be able to teach in many different situations. I believe that this is my true path in the music industry. My mom taught me to be a good teacher and how to communicate with few words and more actions. I just read a great quote today: “It’s your ability to inspire and uplift other people that matters, not your ability to outdo them.”

I could almost hear my mom saying this when I read it. This is so true in life and especially in music.

Since my mom passed away I have obviously had good and bad days for sure and will forever, I believe. I have also taken on a mission for my own life and career path. I have been teaching more passionately and attentive than ever before. I have found another level in my own playing and caring about every note that I play. I am pursuing other business ventures in the music education industry, and I am really focusing on energy and attention to detail.

My mom will inspire me forever and will always push me to be my best.

Go find your inspiration and push yourself to the next level of anything you do. Also remember at the end of everyday, take time to reflect and ask yourself this question: In all that I did today, can I honestly say, “There’s My Best”?

Love you, Mom xoxo




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About the Author
Jayson  Brinkworth

Jayson Brinkworth is an accomplished drummer, percussionist, vocalist, educator and writer based out of Canada. He is co-owner of the Saskatchewan music school Music In The House, as well as the founder of both the Regina Drum Festival and The Stickman Drum Experience.

Jayson proudly endorses Yamaha drums, Sabian cymbals, Vic Firth sticks, Evans heads, Impact cases, Kickport, Flix, Future Sonics and Mountain Rhythm. Visit Jayson online at www.jaysonbrinkworth.com.



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