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Flamburger

Technique by Sean Mitchell // November 30 2014
Flamburger

 

The flam is both the simplest and most difficult of all rudiments-- simple in its setup, yet complex in its execution. The flamburger is a drum lesson I have developed to help you work on your hand technique as well as assist you in developing greater control of the flam and flam-based rudiments. 

What is the flamburger? 

Take a big beefy helping of flams, layered over two juicy flam paradiddles, add a succulent flam drag and finish it with a final layer of hearty flams. Given that the flam can add more "beef" to your fills, it's worth the effort to do exercises like this in order to develop the control over the strokes and the accents. Be sure to pay close attention to the execution of the flam itself. A primary stroke (dropped from a higher position) with a ghost stroke (dropped from a lower position) that fall almost simultaneously to create the sound that is the namesake of this rudiment—f-lam

When playing this lesson in succession for 10 minutes or more everyday, you will develop a greater feel for the importance of the stick heights when playing a proper flam. You will also be challenged by the addition of the paradiddle and drag as a way to keep you in the moment and avoid putting yourself on autopilot, as we tend to do once we have mastered a single rudiment. 

A few things to remember for this lesson: 

  • Use a metronome and start slow.
  • Focus on the flam first and how the sticks must drop and be returned to the flam position in order to make the strokes and accents sound clean. 
  • Count your strokes aloud (i.e. right, left). This will assist you in being more aware of the sticking and will help you develop the exercise more accurately and more quickly.
  • Once you are comfortable doing the exercise for at least 10 minutes in succession, add 10 bpm to your metronome and begin again. 
  • If you are right-handed, start with your left, and visa versa. The lesson should begin with your non-dominant hand and end with your dominant hand.

The idea will always be to keep yourself uncomfortable in the lesson. Your hand technique will not grow if you find the lesson easy to work though. (That is maintenance.) True growth happens from being challenged. If the lesson is feels difficult to execute, you are still learning; keep adapting and paying attention to your form and technique. Once you get it, your mind and your hands have achieved understanding, and that is when it is time to change up the tempo. 

The lesson has been transcribed for you below. 

Bon appetite! 

 

FLAMBURGER FOR RIGHT HANDED PLAYERS. CLICK ON  THE IMAGE TO DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF OF THE LESSON


 

FLAMBURGER FOR LEFT HANDED PLAYERS. CLICK ON  THE IMAGE TO DOWNLOAD A PRINTABLE PDF OF THE LESSON

 

IF YOU LIKED THIS YOU MAY ALSO ENJOY:

http://www.theblackpage.net/technique/what-a-drag

http://www.theblackpage.net/technique/party-time-flams




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About the Author
Sean Mitchell

Sean Mitchell has been an active participant in the drumming industry for over 20 years. He has studied under Crash Test Dummies drummer Mitch Dorge and Drumming's Global Ambassador Dom Famularo. Sean is also a songwriter and regularly performs with his wife (and singer) Jill Mitchell. Sean proudly endorses Aquarian Drumheads.



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